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Archive for February, 2018

Having been selected for Jury Service with effect from Monday 19th February, I  won’t be available to run the blog. The Jury Service is expected to last two weeks but could be longer, and I will let you know when Rakes and Rascals is back to normal again.

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Mimi Matthews Interview - Author picture

I’m delighted to welcome author of both historical non-fiction and Victorian Romance MIMI MATTHEWS to Rakes and Rascals today for an exclusive interview.

I’m so happy to be here, Carol! I absolutely love your historical romance reviews.

~~~~~~~


R&R:

Could you tell us where you were born and what it was like growing up there?

Mimi:
I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. I also attended college and law school here. It’s a beautiful place to live, close to both the ocean and the mountains, and filled with lots of scenic spots. I got my first horse when I was six and some of my best memories are of riding in the foothills of Mt. Diablo or through one of our regional parks. There were also lots of trips into San Francisco to shop and eat or to visit museums or the theatre.

Mimi Matthews Interview - Young Mimi Reading in the School Library
This is me when I was in elementary school. 


R&R
:
How would you describe yourself – temperamental or easy-going?

Mimi:
As a general rule, I think I’m pretty easy-going. However, I can be quite adversarial if the occasion calls for it. I didn’t become a lawyer for nothing.


R&R
:
When it comes to food do you like sweet or savoury or both?

Mimi:
Definitely sweet. I love sugary pastries, cakes, and candies. I’m especially partial to divinity and marzipan. One of my Siamese cats is even named Marzipan!

Mimi Matthews Interview -Marzipan in his bed
My Siamese cat, Marzipan.


R&R:

What is your most treasured possession?

Mimi:
I treasure my pets and my family above all things, but they’re not technically possessions. Among inanimate objects, I suppose it would be my jewellery. I have a lot of special vintage pieces, from the Victorian era through the 1930s. For a recent birthday, I got a gorgeous Edwardian ring with an 8-carat oval citrine surrounded in seed pearls. It’s almost too beautiful to wear. Almost!

Mimi Matthews Interview -Centelleo with head turned
My Andalusian dressage horse, Centelleo.

 

R&R:
If you could afford a second home anywhere in the world where would you choose and why?

Mimi:
I’m a total anglophile, so I’d have to say England. I would love to have a second home in the countryside with a stable, paddocks, and riding ring. Then again, since I wouldn’t ever want to leave any animals behind, this would mean hauling horses back and forth across the pond. Probably not very realistic.


R&R:
Finally, what has been your most embarrassing moment?

Mimi:
Oh gosh, where to start? There have been so many—most from my childhood. Maybe things just seem more embarrassing when you’re a teenager? One moment that I can share comes from my lifelong desire to always be on time. My first semester of college, I arrived early for my first class. Or, at least, I thought I was early. Turns out, the class was already in session. I edged my way into the room, weaving through the students to find a vacant desk and generally making a spectacle of myself. No sooner had I taken my seat than the buzzer rang and everyone else in the class got up and left. It was then I realized, much to my mortification, that this wasn’t my class at all. It was the earlier class, which I had walked in on right as it was ending. Awkward!

~~~~~~~

Thank you for taking time out to be here today and sharing these interesting facts about yourself, Mimi.

Thank you for having me, Carol! It’s been a real pleasure.


If you would like to find out more about Mimi and her books, here are the links:

Website
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

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Salt Hendon Collection

(Salt Hendon, #1)

Genre: Historical Romance (Georgian – Wiltshire, England, 1759 and London, England, 1763)

Cover Blurb

When the Earl of Salt Hendon marries squire’s daughter Jane Despard, Society is aghast. But Jane and Salt share a secret past of heartache and mistrust. They are forced into a marriage neither wants; the Earl to honor a dying man’s wish; Jane to save her stepbrother from financial ruin. Beautiful inside and out, the patient and ever optimistic Jane believes love conquers all; the Earl will take some convincing. Enter Diana St. John, who has been living in a fool’s paradise believing she would be the next Countess of Salt Hendon. She will go to extreme lengths, even murder, to hold Salt’s attention. Can the newlyweds overcome past prejudices and sinister opposition to fall in love all over again?

♥♥♥♥♥♥

Whenever I open one of Lucinda Brant’s books, I know that I will find an engrossing and well-plotted story, richly drawn characters and a heart-warming romance.

When squire’s daughter Jane Despard and Magnus Sinclair, Earl of Salt Hendon(Salt) met at the Salt Hunt Ball four years ago, during Jane’s debut season, they fell deeply in love. After a month-long secret courtship Salt proposed, and Jane accepted.  Succumbing to the moment, they made love in the summerhouse, but Salt was urgently called back to London promising that, on his return, their engagement would be made official and they would marry without delay. However, he failed to return and, finding herself pregnant, she wrote to him but there was still no response and a month later she received his letter breaking off their engagement. When Jane’s father, Sir Felix Despard, discovers her condition and she refuses to name the father, he disowns her, cutting her off without a penny and branding her a whore. Jane is only saved from a Bristol poorhouse, or worse, when she is taken in by Jacob Allenby, a wealthy Bristol merchant and brother of Lady Despard, Sir Felix’s second wife, but loses her unborn baby under the most traumatic circumstances.

Jane and Salt have not met during the past four years, apart from one brief incident two years earlier, a humiliating experience for Jane. However, events are about to change that. Under the terms of Jacob Allenby’s will, Jane must marry by a certain date or her beloved step-brother, Tom, will not receive his full inheritance and to fulfil a promise given to Jane’s father on his deathbed, Salt must marry her. Not a propitious start to a marriage.

Jane cannot understand why Salt hates her so much and why he believes that he is the injured party. After all, she had never disclosed the name of her lover, and it was her life that was destroyed when he cruelly abandoned her to her fate. Gradually, as they spend time together, it is clear they have never stopped loving each other but they are unaware that Diana St. John is willing to go to any lengths to drive them apart.

Salt and Jane are such wonderful characters. Salt exudes power, wealth and authority but Jane is his Achilles heel. He struggles with hating Jane and wanting her at the same time and I enjoyed seeing him gradually soften towards her. He also shows a more relaxed side when he is with his godchildren, Ron and Merry. I loved the scene in the dining room where Jane, Ron and Merry are hiding under the table while Salt and best his friend, Sir Antony Templestowe, are pretending to look for the ‘rats’. Much giggling and laughter ensues which conjured up such a delightful picture in my mind.

Normally Salt is in full control, both mentally and physically but, when Jane’s stepbrother, Tom, tells him exactly what happened to Jane four years ago, he is totally devastated and collapses. Ms. Brant brings so much emotional intensity to this scene that it was as if Salt’s anguish was my own. This is also a defining moment in their relationship because, for the first time, they openly admit their love for each other.

“I love you, Jane.” It was a simple sentence, said simply.
She wasn’t at all sure he was in his right mind, or that he was restful of body, but it was all she had ever wanted to hear him say in the cold light of day since her eighteenth birthday. She smiled into his tired brown eyes and unconsciously sighed her contentment. Tears ran down her flushed face and she kissed his hand and pressed it to her cheek.
“I love you so very much I hate you for frightening me in this way!”

That he is willing to give up his high-profile political career to rusticate in the country in the role of doting husband and father shows the depth of his love for Jane

Jane is such a lovely heroine whose extraordinary beauty is further complimented by her kindness, generosity and sweet nature. I admire her for not letting the tragic events of the past crush her spirit of optimism and I love how she isn’t afraid to stand her ground where Salt is concerned. I cheered her on in the scene where Salt has his secretary, Ellis, read out the rules governing how Jane will live as the Countess of Salt Hendon, but Jane refuses to submit to his ‘insufferable arrogance…

“This document, my lord,” asked Jane with studious enquiry, but unable to hide a sardonic dimple in her left cheek, “does it state terms by which you will conduct yourself as my husband?”

I also love the scene where she shocks him with her frank talk of sexual matters and her playfulness in the bedroom.

In Diana St. John, Ms. Brant has certainly created one of the most memorable villains I have come across. Her obsession with Salt has driven her positively deranged, but what is so scary is the fact that, on the surface, she appears perfectly sane. So much so that, at times, I was convinced her evil plans would succeed. Both devious and cunning, her wickedness knows no bounds which is evident in the events depicted in the harrowing Prologue. Although securely locked away somewhere in wilds of Wales at the end of SALT BRIDE, I know she returns in the sequel, SALT REDUX, to reek further havoc with her evil machinations.

Ms. Brant’s books always contain a colourful cast of secondary characters including Sir Antony Templestowe, Salt’s cousin and best friend and Diana St. John’s younger brother; Tom Allenby, Jane’s step-brother, who always has her welfare at heart; Mr Ellis, Salt’s freckle-faced, hard-working secretary who has a soft spot for Jane; Hilary Wraxton, writer of ‘absurdly odd’ poetry.

Ms. Brant also brings delightful wit and humour to her stories and here are two of my favourite exchanges.

“How will you travel across the Continent if you cannot make a call of nature when we stop at an inn?” Lady Outram enquired.
The poet, who had perched uninvited on the padded arm of a wingchair, jabbed at his temple. “Up here for thinking, Lizzie. I am not just a man of letters, but of ideas.” He beamed at the Countess and
said confidentially, “Had my man pack the family pot de chambre. Heirloom. Passed down from father to son since Scottish James sat upon the English throne. Painted with the family crest. On the inside.”
“How-how sensible of you, Mr. Wraxton,” Jane managed to reply, finding her breath and dabbing at her damp eyes. “A definite must for a trip to the Continent. Who knows what amenities are to be found, or not, at a foreign inn.”

♥♥♥

He gave a shout of laughter. “If it will make you happy, I shall abandon my ridiculous vanity and wear those wretched eyeglasses at the breakfast table. But be warned: A bespectacled Lord Salt perusing the newssheets is a sight almost as quelling as a flare of the noble nostrils.”
Jane smiled cheekily. “What an irresistible combination. My knees are trembling with anticipation already!”

♥♥♥

Ms. Brant effortlessly transported me back to Georgian England and her evocative descriptions of the settings, fashions, furnishings and social etiquette, all combine to bring the era vividly to life. Anyone who follows Ms. Brant’s Pinterest boards will know the extensive research she undertakes to ensure that every aspect is historically correct.

MY VERDICT: A compelling story, multi-layered characters, a heart-warming romance and a deranged but cunning villain, all combine to make SALT BRIDE a must read.


REVIEW RATING: STELLAR 5 STARS


SENSUALITY RATING: SUBTLE

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I’m delighted to welcome Historical Romance author JOANNA CHAMBERS to Rakes and Rascals today for an exclusive interview.

Thanks for inviting me! It’s a pleasure to be here!

~~~~~~~


R&R:

Could you tell us where you were born and what it was like growing up there?

Joanna:
I was born and grew up in a working-class town in Scotland. The 1980s is stereotypically often shown in the media as a time of yuppies and wealth but it wasn’t at all like that where I lived. I was very focused on escaping, which I did both literally (when I went to university) and metaphorically (through reading).

 

R&R:
How would you describe yourself – temperamental or easy-going?

Joanna:
With anyone other than those closest to me, I’m pretty easy-going. With my husband and children, though, I’m loud and loving and demanding and a bit histrionic. In short, I find intimacy difficult but the people closest to me get everything, all the good and all the bad too, all the time.


R&R:
When it comes to food do you like sweet or savoury or both?

Joanna:
Both. Everything. Add in sour, spicy and umami. I love my food and my husband is a wonderful cook. Also, I’m on a one-woman-mission to bring Mrs Tilly’s fudge to the masses.

 

R&R:
What is your most treasured possession?

Joanna:
All the little things my children have made for me. Like this. My youngest son made this when he was about 5 or 6 for “people who can’t speak”. They put their messages inside then eject them onto the lap of the intended recipient. This message was for me 😊

Joanna Chambers Interview - picture 1


R&R:
If you could afford a second home anywhere in the world where would you choose and why?

Joanna:
The Lake District because I love it there. It’s beautiful.

Joanna Chambers Interview - picture 2 Lake District


R&R:
Finally, what has been your most embarrassing moment?

Joanna:
Probably the time I peed myself going down a slide when I was three. I don’t think anything since has felt *more* embarrassing than that – I have this theory that these seemingly tiny moments from early childhood are actually really significant because they shape our understanding of what particular emotions are. That incident encapsulated for me what embarrassment/ humiliation/ shame is.

~~~~~~~

Thank you for taking time out to be here today and sharing these interesting facts about yourself, Joanna.

You’re welcome, Carol 😊 You now know more than you probably ever wanted to!

 

If you would like to find out more about Joanna and her books, here are the links:

Website
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

 

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THE FABULOUS STELLA RILEY HAS A NEW AUDIO BOOK OUT, NARRATED BY THE EQUALLY FABULOUS ALEX WYNDHAM.

The Marigold Chain Audio Book

Genre: Historical Romance (Restoration, 1666)

Cover Blurb

It is 1666 – the year when people who take prophecy seriously believe that the world is going to end.

For Chloe Herveaux – twenty years old, half-French and practical – marriage to wild, unpredictable Alex Deveril offers escape from a home she hates. For Alex, it is a refuge of a different kind. But while the marriage remains in name only and both, for reasons of their own, agree to seek an annulment, other forces are gathering.

England is once again at war with the Dutch and Prince Rupert, now commanding the Royal Navy, suspects that sabotage is at work within the fleet. Instructed to find the arch-traitor, Alex enters a dark labyrinth of intrigue – where no life is safe and nothing is what it seems.

Chloe, meanwhile, navigates the malice and scandal of Charles II’s licentious Court and plots a course of her own aimed at financial independence. But as the surprising facets of Mr Deveril’s personality are gradually revealed to her, the long-awaited annulment becomes a double-edged sword.

Absorbed in his search for a traitor, Alex spares little thought for his bride – until a hot June night on the Falcon Stairs when he and Chloe stand united by tragedy.

As the flames of the Great Fire sweep over London, Alex and Chloe face their ultimate test. Their world is at risk … their choices may save it.

♥♥♥♥♥♥

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Satyr's Son Audio

(Roxton Family Saga, #5)

Genre: Historical Romance (Georgian, 1786)

Cover Blurb:

Roxton Family Saga Book 5: Henri-Antoine and Lisa’s Happily Ever After 

London, 1786. Lord Henri-Antoine has returned from the Grand Tour to a life of privilege and excess. A vast inheritance allows him every indulgence, free from responsibility. Yet, Henri-Antoine maintains a well-ordered existence, going to great lengths to conceal an affliction few understand, and many fear.

Miss Lisa Crisp is a penniless orphan who relies on the charity of relatives to keep her from the poorhouse. Intelligent and unflappable, Lisa will not allow poverty to define her. She leads a useful life working among the sick poor.

Under startling circumstances, Henri-Antoine and Lisa meet. There is instant attraction. When they find themselves attending the same wedding in the country, Henri-Antoine offers Lisa a scandalous proposition, one she should refuse but yearns to accept. Following her heart could ruin them both.

♥♥♥♥♥♥

So, we reach the end of Lucinda Brant’s sumptuous Georgian, Roxton family saga. Or do we? I can’t believe Ms. Brant will find it easy to let go of the very real and loveable Roxton family she has created and I’m sure I speak for other fans when I say I hope she doesn’t – at least not yet. This is a family with secrets still to reveal and we need to know them. For instance, what events in Renard Hesham’s early life shaped him into the man we first meet in Noble Satyr? Almost forty years of his life are still unaccounted for and, as usual, Ms. Brant has dropped subtle hints that there is more to him than she has yet told us. However, for the purposes of this review, with Satyr’s Son, the series has come full circle from where it began as Ms. Brant tells Lord Henri-Antoine (Harry) Hesham’s story, the younger of Renard and Antonia’s two sons.

On first acquaintance, Lord Henri-Antoine Hesham is shown in a bad light – blatantly and unapologetically bedding his friend’s mistress and ringleader of a group of badly behaving, aristocratic friends. However, a little later, it becomes clear that, in reality, he is actually a kind and generous young man whose outward demeanour hides a deep-seated vulnerability. Harry has suffered from debilitating falling sickness (epilepsy) since birth and, as a result, has deliberately adopted an aloofness, preferring to hold himself apart from most people, even his family up to a point. This demeanour is a coping mechanism, albeit one that does him no favours with his peers. But, early in the story, amidst Harry’s excesses, the author gives us a glimpse into his true character –  for why would he go to the trouble of attending an auction to purchase shells for his beloved little sister, Elsie, if he were as uncaring as he prefers people to believe him?

It is during one of his fits that he ‘meets’ the absolute antithesis of himself. Lisa Crisp is a poor, hardworking girl with no connections to the nobility, other than as a niece by marriage to Lord Henri-Antoine’s mother’s ex lady’s maid.  Lisa lives on the charity of the family and has done so since she was orphaned as a child. She just happens to be in the right place at the right time when Harry literally falls at her feet during an epileptic seizure. As an assistant in her uncle’s dispensary for the sick poor, Lisa is used to coping with all kinds of ailments, including falling sickness, and deals with the situation in her normal practical, no nonsense manner – calmly and gently soothing Harry, wiping his face and stroking his hair during the worst of his struggles. Harry only has the haziest of recollections after he recovers but does recall seeing the image of a Botticelli Angel just before he blacks out. This image is confirmed by his best friend Jack (Sir John) Cavendish, who was also there, and leaves Harry intrigued and determined to find and thank his ‘Angel’. His minders, or ‘lads’ as they are known, protect him from prying eyes when he is at his most vulnerable and it is virtually unknown for anyone to witness an attack let alone actually witness one and not be repulsed by it. I was, by this time, loving the direction this story was taking, because I don’t ever remember coming across such a scenario before and one where the author, who has quite obviously done her homework, deals with the implications of it in such a sensitive and caring manner.

It doesn’t take Harry long to track Lisa down to her uncle’s dispensary and it just so happens that he knows of Dr Warner, an eminent physician, anatomist and the husband of Lisa’s cousin. The doctor has radical ideas well ahead of his time with regard to sickness/illness and the treatment of it, but also believes that to further the advancement of medical science, the future training of bright young men to become physicians is vital. As most of these young men do not have wealth or connections, Dr Warner has applied for the funds to enable their training which he hopes will come from rich sponsors. Harry is one such sponsor – a philanthropist with a genuine interest in furthering medical science for both rich and poor, notwithstanding his own apparently incurable disease. This interest and generosity is yet another dimension to Harry’s character that his critics are unaware of and it has long been his practice to anonymously invest large amounts of his own money through the Fournier Foundation (Harry’s brain child) to aid such projects that Dr Warner needs support and funding for.

It became clear to his parents early in Harry’s life that his affliction could not be ignored and was unlikely to go away and must therefore be dealt with. His father, Renard Hesham, fifth Duke of Roxton, a very forward-thinking man, sets the wheels in motion for Harry to be able to do something worthwhile with his life. In his young days, Roxton was considered an unredeemable rake but marriage to Antonia had changed his habits for ever. Despite his rakish past, he was a highly intelligent man and having finally found the love of his life in middle age, he had settled down to become a loving husband and father. His wife and children became his life and he spent much of the first twelve years of his younger son’s life caring for and observing him during and in the aftermath of his traumatic seizures. Renard came to see and understand the similar character traits that he and Harry shared and took the momentous step of bequeathing his beloved son a fortune. The size of this fortune far exceeded the amount considered to be the norm for a younger son, but Roxton obviously trusted his son would use it wisely – after all, was he not his son? This fortune, along with his extraordinary good looks, further sets Harry apart from his peers; it enables him to live independently and cope with his illness without detection, but it also has the unfortunate effect of causing envy among his peers, which only served to accentuate his outwardly arrogant aloofness.

Since the age of nine, Sir John Cavendish has been Harry’s one true friend and the only person outside his family who truly knows Lord Henri-Antoine Hesham and appreciates and accepts the frustrations which cause his friend to lash out at the people he cares for, himself included. Jack is to marry Teddy, his first cousin, and the daughter of Proud Mary (book 4 in the Roxton Family Saga). Jack worries about leaving his friend, as he must on his marriage to his childhood sweetheart and wishes fervently for him to ‘fall off a cliff in love’ as Jack is convinced will happen to his friend one day. Much of the ongoing story takes place at Treat, ancestral home of the Roxton family, where the family wedding is to take place. Teddy is as delightful a young woman as she was a child (I adored her characterisation in Proud Mary). She has no airs and graces and is excited that her best friend from her school days, Lisa Crisp, has been found – at Teddy’s request – by her cousin, Antonia, Duchess of Kinross and dowager Duchess of Roxton and a wedding invitation issued.

Despite her lowly birth, Lisa soon has most people at Treat eating out of her hand, with her natural sweetness of nature and unaffected beauty. Harry too is smitten and has been since their first meeting, and I loved how Ms. Brant develops the love story between them, plausibly knocking down the social barriers in the process. From their first conscious meeting (after Harry tracks her down), it is obvious that they are meant to be together but how to bring these two polar opposites together. He is his own worst enemy because, in the way of someone like Harry who is not as sure of himself as he appears but needs to hide his lack of self-confidence, he constantly strikes out at the people he loves the most, albeit usually with the finest of motives.

Harry wants Lisa very much but believes he is not worthy of her love and must save her from wanting someone like him. Harry is a complex character who hasn’t gone down well with some readers/reviewers. Personally, I loved him and can see why someone such as Lisa would have been captivated by him. Imagine living with an affliction such as his in the time this story is set. He is saved from an asylum only because of his wealth, position and powerful family and must live his life with the constant fear of humiliation and scandal, not only for himself but for his family as well, should his affliction become public. Despite his looks and wealth, how could he not be vulnerable and unsure of his self?  And yet, he takes an active interest and anonymously donates to causes which aid the sick poor. No, Harry is a rather gorgeous, if flawed young man, and Lisa’s evident love for him, her complete disregard for his illness and her refusal to be pushed away for her own good is heart-warming. Her pure and unselfish love becomes even more evident towards the end of the story in a couple of beautiful and moving scenes in which Antonia, Julian and Harry are involved. One scene in particular is reminiscent of one in which Deb was involved in Midnight Marriage. In fact, there are a couple of instances where Ms. Brant gives a *nod* to scenes in which Harry behaves in much the same way as his father did. However, I fear that only true lovers and followers of Ms. Brant’s exquisite work will realise the author’s intentions.

As usual, Ms. Brant’s attention to detail and in-depth research into the life and times of the Georgian period is second to none and I always come away from reading one of her books more knowledgeable.  In Satyr’s Son, my ahhh moment came when the author tells us of the origins of London’s world famous Natural History Museum.  I shall return on my next visit with fresh eyes to look for evidence of the family who once lived there.

How many ways can I say that Alex Wyndham is my favourite narrator? That his name on an audio book will always hook me? It becomes more and more difficult after the many reviews I’ve written for books he has narrated, or performed, would be a fairer adjective. As usual, he has outdone himself and has even ‘found’ a new voice that exactly matches the description of the character I heard in my head when I read the print version of Satyr’s Son. Lord Henri-Antoine is said to have a voice ‘like hot chocolate’ and I couldn’t agree more as Alex Wyndham rises to the challenge of proving it. Then, I’ve always thought that this man has a voice I could easily drown in – like melted chocolate or maybe even black velvet. He is multi-talented with oodles of artistic jeux de vie and it is very easy to forget that he is handling a multi character cast of male and female characters. But before I stop waxing lyrical, I must mention one of my favourite characters of this series – Jonathon, Duke of Kinross. Thanks to Ms. Brant’s wonderful characterisation and Alex Wyndham’s portrayal of him, I DO forget that he’s actually just a character from the author’s clever and fertile imagination. He is 6’4″of gorgeousness, issuing words of wisdom in the special voice this performer keeps just for him, and which somehow encompasses his ebullient bigness and inherent kindness and always gives me goose bumps!

MY VERDICT: A wonderful end to a wonderful series? Hopefully, not the end. From NOBLE SATYR TO SATYR’S SON…which is my favourite of the series? I can’t say because whichever book I’m reading or listening to at the time tends to be my favourite. However, SATYR’S SON is definitely a Stellar 5 stars for me.

 

REVIEW RATING: STELLAR 5 STARS

NARRATION REVIEW RATING: STELLAR 5 STARS

 SENSUALITY RATING: SUBTLE

 

 Roxton Family Saga (click on the book covers for more details):

 Noble Satyr Midnight Marriage Autumn Duchess Dair Devil Proud Mary Satyr's Son

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I’m delighted to welcome USA TODAY Bestselling author of erotic historical romance JESS MICHAELS to Rakes and Rascals today for an exclusive interview.

Thank you do much for having me! I’m excited to be here!


~~~~~~~


R&R:

Could you tell us where you were born and what it was like growing up there?

Jess:
I was born outside of Philadelphia, but we moved to Idaho when I was young so that’s where I grew up. It’s beautiful there, lots of outdoorsy things to do. But it was an insulated community and I didn’t belong to the predominant group, so I didn’t have many friends growing up. I’d say it had its disadvantages and its advantages. But I wouldn’t move back.

 

R&R:
How would you describe yourself – temperamental or easy-going?

Jess:
I’m definitely not easy-going. LOL But I wouldn’t say temperamental either. I’m harder on myself than anyone else. I have a high standard for myself, something I’m working on every day. I work really hard (average about 80 hours a week on writing and promoting books) and I’m a focused and driven person. But if people are in my life who don’t treat me well I tend to just move on. Life is too short to be miserable.

 

R&R:
When it comes to food do you like sweet or savoury or both?

Jess:
I’ll take both for sure. I love Salt & Vinegar chips, which are super salty and amazing. But I also love chocolate and cake and pie. See, I shouldn’t have started with food because….yum. But I’ve been working on losing weight (I’m down 25lbs as of this interview) so I’m not eating any of those wonderful things right now. And I’m sad.

 

R&R:
What is your most treasured possession?

Jess:
I think I value memories and experiences more than possessions. My husband and I travel a lot and those are the moments and times that really matter. Being on the Great Wall of China on our 11th wedding anniversary meant more to me than a thing that would commemorated the event. Or going to Florence with my parents as a special gift to them was better than a “thing”. I like things, don’t get me wrong. I love a good purse and I have a POPS! Collection, but if I had to pick, I’d take an experience over a thing any day.

 

R&R:
If you could afford a second home anywhere in the world where would you choose and why?

Jess:
We’ve actually talked a lot about buying a second home or vacation home. But the price of doing it is really higher than just taking like ten amazing vacations. I don’t have one place I like to visit over and over again enough to justify the second permanent home. If we were to move again though, I think I’d pick a place near the ocean that was more liberally minded and had great sushi.

 

R&R:
Finally, what has been your most embarrassing moment?

Jess:
As I get older, I’m starting to care less what people think of me, so I don’t really have embarrassing moments anymore. But I used to spend a lot of time wondering if I was being too loud or too passionate or too boisterous or too “me”. And then I’d just stew on that for…hmmmmm…fifteen years or so. Because why not wake up on the night thinking about “that one time” from a decade ago? It’s a slow process to be comfortable with me and just eject anyone who isn’t down for who I am, but I’m getting there.

~~~~~~~

 

Thank you for taking time out to be here today and sharing these interesting facts about yourself, Jess.

 Thank you so much for having me!

 

 

If you would like to find out more about Jess and her books, here are the links:

Website
Goodreads
Facebook
Twitter

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Historical Romance Reviews

Delilah Marvelle Loves Her Readers

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Caz's Reading Room

Fiction of a historical nature and anything else that takes my fancy

The Reading Wench

Historical Romance Reviews

Sonya's Stuff

Mostly Books

doingsomereading

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La Deetda Reads

Book Reviews, Thoughts and Recipes

And Then She Kissed Him

Regency romance redrawn with Author Cora Lee

Romantic Historical Reviews

Where History Meets Passion

Booktalk with Eileen: Journaling a Journey -- Learning the Art of Crafting a Novel

Sharing the experience of living a thousand lives and creating new ones

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